Contact: Alexander Shtifman
Phone: 617-713-8989
alex...@childrens.harvard.edu

Frederick W. Alt, Ph.D., Director and President of PCMM/IDI, Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics at Children's Hospital Boston has been named one of 65 new members of the Institutes Of Medicine (IOM).

The announcement was made today, Monday, Oct. 17th, 2011 in conjunction with its 41st annual meeting.  Election to the IOM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.  Five foreign associates were also named.

"It is a great pleasure to welcome these distinguished and accomplished individuals to the Institute of Medicine," said IOM President Harvey V. Fineberg.  "Each of these new members stands out as a professional whose research, knowledge, and skills have significantly advanced health and medicine, and their achievements are an inspiration.  The Institute of Medicine is greatly enriched by the addition of our newly elected colleagues."

New members are elected by current active members through a highly selective process that recognizes individuals who have made major contributions to the advancement of the medical sciences, health care, and public health.  A diversity of talent among IOM's membership is assured by the Institute's charter, which stipulates that at least one-quarter of the membership is selected from outside the health professions, for example, from such fields as the natural, social, and behavioral sciences; law; engineering; and the humanities.  The newly elected members raise IOM's total active membership to 1,688 and the number of foreign associates to 102.  With an additional 80 members holding emeritus status, IOM's total membership is 1,870.

The Institute of Medicine is unique in its structure as both an honorific membership organization and an advisory organization.  Established in 1970 as the health branch of the National Academy of Sciences, IOM has become recognized as a national resource for independent, scientifically informed analysis and recommendations on health issues.  With their election, members make a commitment to volunteer their service on IOM committees, boards, and other activities.  Projects during the past year include studies on calculating people's vitamin D and calcium needs; improving the process for clearing medical devices for the market; preventing obesity among infants and toddlers; improving American's access to oral health care; preparing for the future of HIV/AIDS in Africa; ensuring the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people; and enhancing nurses' role in improving health care.

For the full list of new members and the IOM press release, click here.

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) is an independent, nonprofit organization that works outside of government to provide unbiased and authoritative advice to decision makers and the public.

Established in 1970, the IOM is the health arm of the National Academy of Sciences, which was chartered under President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. Nearly 150 years later, the National Academy of Sciences has expanded into what is collectively known as the National Academies, which comprises the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council, and the IOM.