Contact: Alexander Shtifman
Phone: 617-713-8989
alex...@childrens.harvard.edu

Thanks to the leadership of IDI Senior Investigator Judy Lieberman, M.D., Ph.D., the Institute has acquired a cutting-edge piece of hybrid technology - a multispectral imaging cytometer -- that promises to advance infectious disease research at IDI and nearby partner institutions.

The new Imagestream 100 Multispectral Imaging Cytometer, produced by Amnis Corporation, is being acquired through a $415,000 grant from the NIH which includes $56,000 for a state-of-the-art bio-containment chamber to allow research with infectious agents. The grant was a joint proposal between IDI and the Harvard Center for AIDS Research. The equipment will be located, as a new core facility, in IDI laboratory space at 200 Longwood Avenue.

Use of this technology will be shared primarily by the Lieberman lab, the labs of Senior Investigators Anjana Rao and Anne Goldfeld at IDI, as well as by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Children's Hospital Boston, and Harvard Medical School.

The Imagestream 100 is a hybrid instrument that combines the capabilities of flow cytometry with the latest advances in microscopic imaging; it allows for multi-spectral imaging of populations of moving cells - up to 100 cells per second. Because thousand of cells are analyzed at one time, this technology bypasses the limitations of conventional microscopy and allows users to characterize the properties of specific immune cells responding to infection, rare infected cells, and cells in the blood.

The Imagestream 100 will support research studies in AIDS, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases, as well as research into stem cells, cancer progression, vaccines, and basic immunology. The Lieberman lab, for instance, will use the technology to examine exactly how certain T cells block chronic infection, while the Goldfeld lab plans on using the Imagestream 100 to further study cytokine gene regulation and HIV replication. Until now, no such imaging technology has been available in the Longwood Medical Area.