Drawing a ring around antiviral immunity

Ubiquitin doesn't just tag proteins for recycling. It also may help keep our antiviral immune response in balance.

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Study identifies protein that helps developing germ cells wipe genes clean of past imprints

A protein called Tet1 is partly responsible for giving primordial germ cells a clean epigenetic slate before developing into sperm and egg cells, according to a new study by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital.

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How do you stop an aggressive breast cancer? Keep it from recycling

When the drug Velcade® came on the market in 2003, it was seen as a godsend for patients with multiple myeloma, an intractable blood cancer that until then was uniformly fatal.

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Unraveling the link between DNA sensing and lupus

A team led by Dr. Qian Yin, a senior postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Hao Wu’s lab used structural and functional approaches to elucidate how an intricate interplay between p202, a critical checkpoint protein involved in autoimmunity, and a protein that monitors the cytoplasm for abnormal dsDNA (AIM2) may be involved in lupus pathogenesis.

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Study finds that microbes influence B-cell development in the gut.

Gut bacteria exert a dramatic, systemic effect on the development of the immune system's B-lymphocytes, according to a new mouse study by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital.

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Follicular dendritic cells: Libraries of immune memory

Researchers at the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH), previously known as the Immune Disease Institute (PCMM/IDI), have explained important mechanisms underlying immune memory, specifically how antigens are retained over long periods of time and made repeatedly accessible to B cells.

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Biomarker could help scientists choose the right cell line when conducting stem cell experiments

According to members of the Zhang lab, stem cells that strongly express a gene called WNT3 are biased to develop into cells and tissues including pancreas, liver and bladder.

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A DNA-unraveling enzyme in neutrophils is essential for deep vein thrombosis

Research led by graduate student Kimberly Martinod and Denisa Wagner, Ph.D., adds a new twist to the growing body of evidence of neutrophils' role in dangerous blood clots

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Moving in on what makes malaria move

A team led by Timothy A. Springer, Ph.D., of Boston Children's Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, used X-ray crystallography to work out both the three-dimensional structure of TRAP and how it changes shape as it helps the parasite move about.

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Ills of Aging Blood - Short-circuited stem cell programming linked to failing blood development

Isabel Beerman, Derrick Rossi and colleagues tell us about changes in the epigenome of blood stem cells as they age

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RNA interference: Putting bacteria to work to silence genes

Judy Lieberman and Linfeng Huang reported important progress in production of siRNAs.

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A picture is worth a thousand words for understating innate immunity

In a recent paper in Cell, Sun Hur, Ph.D., and her group spotlight one of our dsRNA pattern recognizers, a protein called MDA5.

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Forcing lymphoma cells into withdrawal, one subtype at a time

Hao Wu and colleagues asked if one of these molecules could break the back of a treatment-resistant kind of lymphoma?

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A new role for NFAT5 in innate immunity and in the regulation of HIV by TB co-infection

Goldfeld lab determines that NFAT5 plays a crucial role in direct regulation of HIV-1 replication by MTb, but also demonstrate for the first time a general role for NFAT5 in control of gene expression, mediated by MTb and the TLR signal transduction pathway.

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The bacterial chromosome as a soft spring

Wong lab researchers use a unique "micropiston" to measure mechanical properties of individual Escherichia Coli chromosomes.

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Caught on Film

Single-molecule movies capture the chaotic origins of dynamic assembly in cells.

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Featured News Story

Drawing a ring around antiviral immunity

Drawing a ring around antiviral immunity

If you follow cancer biology, then you’ve probably heard of ubiquitin before. Ubiquitin tags a cell’s damaged or used proteins and guides them to a cellular machine called the proteasome, which breaks them down and recycles their amino acids. Proteasome-blocking drugs like Velcade® that go after that recycling pathway in cancer cells have been very successful at treating two blood cancers—multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma—and may hold promise for other cancers as well.

Less well known, however, is the fact that ubiquitin helps normal, healthy cells raise an alarm when viruses attack. Ubiquitin works with a protein called RIG-I, part of a complex signaling pathway that detects viral RNA and triggers an innate antiviral immune response.

Sun Hur, PhD, a structural biologist in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, has been studying RIG-I and other members of the innate cellular… Read More »

Announcements

Dr. Feilong Meng was awarded a postdoctoral research grant from the Lymphoma Research Foundation.

Dr. Feilong Meng was awarded a postdoctoral research…

When the human body is infected with a foreign pathogen, B cells diversify antibody repertoire by introducing mutations into the antibody variable regions, which process is initiated by Activation-Induced… Read More »

Dr. Jiazhi Hu was awarded the Cancer Research Institute Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship.

Dr. Jiazhi Hu was awarded the Cancer Research Institute…

During this three-year award Dr. Hu, a postdoctoral fellow in the Alt lab, will investigate the mechanism of the development of B cell lymphomas originated from ATM deficiency or AID off-target activity.

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